case reports

Getting started with case reports

A case report is the perfect starting point for a resident new to scholarly publishing. It is easy to write, requires little creativity (after all it is just a documentation of a patient that came to meet the doctor) and though has limited impact, has good educational value. More than anything else, it lowers the barrier to scientific writing.


There is a catch though – case reports are the low hanging fruits. Accordingly there is quite a bit of competition there – lot of people want to write, very few publishers want to publish. This has created a vacuum which has been fulfilled by speciality case report journals. These journals publish only case reports and therefore have a much higher acceptance rate – somewhere in the range of 30 to 70 %. The increased demand also causes a situation where publishers may resort to questionable practices. In fact, almost half the journals are found to be dubious.



How to identify the genuine journals?


The trick is to find those case report journals which are PubMed Indexed. Only one PubMed Indexed journal(published by Baishideng group) is known to indulge in questionable practices[Refer to the Excel file linked at the end of the article]. So a case report journal that is PubMed Indexed is highly likely to be genuine. For example, my first publication was a case report in BMJ case reports.  BMJ case reports has a decent acceptance rate, but in order to submit one of the authors or the institution must have subscription. Individual subscription costs around 185 GBP (around Rs.15000), but just one subscription in a department is more than enough. Be sure to check if your institution has subscription – in which case, you can contact the librarian to get the submission access code. BMJ case reports doesn’t have an impact factor as such (many case report only journals don’t.). However you can use the scimagojr 2 year citations per article as a reasonable proxy.


Of course, case reports are also published by journals that publish other stuff like reviews and original articles. However the acceptance rate is likely to be lower in these journals. If you are confident of your material, it is best to try in a general journal first before trying a case reports only journal. When in doubt, ask an expert.



A master list of case reports only journals can be accessed in Excel format here. Sadly I couldn’t get a master list of submission fees – if you have details on that, do let me know. If you found this post useful, please share with your friends.


Further reading


New journals for publishing medical case reports

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